In Praise of Older Women : The Amorous Recollections of Andras Vajda

Author(s): Stephen Vizinczey

General Fiction

'You cannot put it down: witty, moving and it's all about sex' - Margaret Drabble. 'A masterpiece ...dazzling ...like all great novels, it shows the truth about life' - Le Monde. 'At the basis of pleasure, of eroticism, Vizinczey places consciousness. His novel consists of scenes which you can see ...Stupefying: it leaves you breathless with excitement. Here, everything is living ardour, inexhaustible fervour' - Giorgio Montefoschi, "Corriere della Sera". Review: A funny novel about sex, or rather (which is rarer) a novel which is funny as well as touching about sex ... elegant, exact and melodious -- Isabel Quigly Sunday Telegraph The delicious adventures of a young Casanova who appreciates maturity while acquiring it himself. In turn naive, sophisticated, arrogant, disarming, the narrator woos his women and his tale wins the reader -- Polly Devlin Vogue Spectacular! It's always a risky business, re-reading a book which was important to you in your adolescence. But re-reading this one, I was struck by a great deal that I missed before ... a much richer book than I remembered. Immensely pleasurable. -- A. A. Gill (2010) A skinny book with a funny name, a title I didn't know, by an author I'd never heard of, which turns out to be just wonderful -- John Self (2010) theasylum.wordpress.com First published 1965 This edition available June 2010. Paperback 256pp h198mm x w129mm x s15mm 194g


Product Information

A funny novel about sex, or rather (which is rarer) a novel which is funny as well as touching about sex ... elegant, exact and melodious -- Isabel Quigly Sunday Telegraph The delicious adventures of a young Casanova who appreciates maturity while acquiring it himself. In turn naive, sophisticated, arrogant, disarming, the narrator woos his women and his tale wins the reader -- Polly Devlin Vogue Spectacular! It's always a risky business, re-reading a book which was important to you in your adolescence. But re-reading this one, I was struck by a great deal that I missed before ... a much richer book than I remembered. Immensely pleasurable. -- A. A. Gill (2010) A skinny book with a funny name, a title I didn't know, by an author I'd never heard of, which turns out to be just wonderful -- John Self (2010) theasylum.wordpress.com

Stephen Vizinczey is a poet, playwright and novelist, best known for his novels In Praise of Older Women (1965) and An Innocent Millionaire (1983). Born in Hungary in 1933, he was only two years old when his father was assassinated by the Nazis, and later also lost his uncle to the communists. Having studied under George Lukacs at the University of Budapest, he graduated from the city's Academy of Theatre and Film Arts in 1956. He took part in the Hungarian Revolution of 1956, and later emigrated to Canada, speaking only 50 words of English. He learned the language while writing scripts for the National Film Board of Canada; subsequently, he founded and edited a literary-political magazine, Exchange, and joined CBC/Radio Canada as a writer and producer. In 1966 he moved to London where he still lives

General Fields

  • : 9780141192062
  • : Penguin Books Ltd
  • : Penguin Books Ltd
  • : January 2010
  • : 198mm X 129mm X 15mm
  • : United Kingdom
  • : January 2010
  • : books

Special Fields

  • : Paperback
  • : 1
  • : English
  • : 823.914
  • : oc2010002370
  • : 256
  • : Stephen Vizinczey